The treatment options for breast cancer patients

The National Comprehensive Cancer Network d cancer patient participation in clinical trials as the gold standard for treatment. Cancer therapy selection, dosing, administration, and the management of related adverse events can be a complex process that should be handled by an experienced healthcare team. Clinicians must choose and verify treatment options based on the individual patient; drug dose modifications and supportive care interventions should be administered accordingly.

The treatment options for breast cancer patients

Many women are relieved or excited to be finished with breast cancer treatment. But it can also be a time of worry for women who fear their cancer could come back, or who feel lost without the same frequency of visits with their cancer care team.

Even after you have completed breast cancer treatment, your doctors will want to watch you closely. During these visits, your doctors will ask if you are having any problems.

They may do exams and lab tests or imaging tests to look for signs of cancer or treatment side effects.

Breast Cancer: Integrative Treatment Program | CTCA

Almost any cancer treatment can have side effects. Some might only last for a few days or weeks, but others might last a long time. Some side effects might not even show up until years after you have finished treatment. Visits with your doctor are a good time for you to ask questions and talk about any changes or problems you notice or concerns you have.

The treatment options for breast cancer patients

However, if you have additional concerns about your cancer, you do not have to wait until your next scheduled visit. You can call your doctor immediately.

Typical follow-up schedules Doctor visits: At first, your follow-up doctor visits will probably be scheduled for every few months. The longer you have been free of cancer, the less often the appointments are needed. After 5 years, they are typically done about once a year.

Treating Breast Cancer

If you had breast-conserving surgeryyou will get a mammogram about months after surgery and radiation are completed, and then at least every year after that. Depending on the type of mastectomy you had, you may still need to have yearly mammograms on the remaining breast. If you are taking either of the hormone drugs tamoxifen or toremifene and still have your uterus, you should have pelvic exams every year because these drugs can increase your risk of uterine cancer.

This risk is highest in women who have gone through menopause. Be sure to tell your doctor right away about any unusual vaginal bleeding, such as vaginal bleeding or spotting after menopause, bleeding or spotting between periods, or a change in your periods.

If you are taking an aromatase inhibitor anastrozole, letrozole, or exemestane for early stage breast cancer, or if you go through menopause as a result of treatment, your doctor will want to monitor your bone health and may consider testing your bone density.

But they might be done if you have symptoms or physical exam findings that suggest that the cancer might have come back. These and other tests may also be done as part of evaluating new treatments by clinical trials. Your doctor may also look for circulating tumor cells in the blood or measure levels of blood tumor markers such as CA, CAor CEA.

The blood levels of tumor markers go up in some women if their cancer has spread to bones or other organs such as the liver. They are not elevated in all women with recurrence, so they aren't always helpful. If they are elevated, your doctor might use them to monitor the results of therapy.

In fact, women who have had breast cancer are at higher risk for certain other cancers. To learn more about the risks of second cancers and what you can do about them, see Second Cancers After Breast Cancer. Ask your doctor for a survivorship care plan Talk with your doctor about developing a survivorship care plan for you.Breast cancer treatment depends on several factors and can include combinations of surgery, chemotherapy, radiation, hormone, and targeted therapy.

Learn more about how breast cancer is diagnosed and treated in this expert-reviewed summary. Advances in cancer treatment are happening every day at MD Anderson. Learn more about the cancer treatment options available to you, including surgery, radiation therapy, chemotherapy, stem cell transplantation and other advanced therapies.

Advances in cancer treatment are happening every day at MD. See the Metastatic Breast Cancer section for information about treatment options for breast cancer that has spread to parts of the body outside the breast, chest wall, or nearby lymph nodes.

Use our clinical trial search to find NCI-supported cancer clinical trials that are accepting patients. Breast cancer is a complex disease with many types, each with its own set of symptoms, risk factors and treatment approaches. Each type of breast cancer is characterized by the type of cells that become malignant in the breast skin, duct or tissue.

Evidence-based Natural Triple Negative Breast Cancer Treatment. Here are a few natural substances that work with the body to kill unhealthy cells (including stem cells) and boost the immune system. Aug 21,  · Many women are relieved or excited to be finished with breast cancer treatment.

But it can also be a time of worry for women who fear their cancer could come back, or who feel lost without the same frequency of visits with their cancer care team.

Surgery for Breast Cancer